The description of love and its characteristics

Dictionary definitions[ edit ] The three components of love are as follows Passion: Passion can be associated with either physical arousal or emotional stimulation. Passion is defined in three ways: A strong feeling of enthusiasm or excitement for something or about doing something [3] A strong feeling such as anger that causes people to act in a dangerous way strong sexual or romantic feeling for someone Intimacy:

The description of love and its characteristics

Eros playing flute, Athenian red-figure lekythos C5th B. The poet Hesiod first represents him as a primordial deity who emerges self-born at the beginning of time to spur procreation. See the Protogenos Eros and Phanes for more information. The same poet later describes two love-gods, Eros and Himeros Desireaccompanying Aphrodite at the time of her birth from the sea-foam.

Some classical writers interpreted this to mean the pair were born of the goddess immediately following her birth or else alongside her from the sea-foam.

The description of love and its characteristics

The scene was particular popular in ancient art where the godlings flutter about the goddess as she reclines inside a conch-shell. Eventually Eros was multiplied by ancient poets and artists into a host of Erotes Roman Cupides. The singular Eros, however, remained distinct in myth.

It was he who lit the flame of love in the hearts of the gods and men, armed with either a bow and arrows or a flaming torch. Eros was often portrayed as the disobedient but fiercely loyal child of Aphrodite. In ancient vase painting Eros is depicted as either a handsome youth or child. His attributes were varied--from the usual bow and arrows, to the gifts of a lover such as a hare, sash, or flower.

Sculptors preferred the image of the bow-armed boy, whereas mosaic artists favoured the figure of a winged putto plump baby. In the sense in which he is usually conceived, Eros is the creature of the later Greek poets; and in order to understand the ancients properly we must distinguish three Erotes: Homer does not mention Eros, and Hesiod, the earliest author that mentions him, describes him as the cosmogonic Eros.

A. Kleinbach

First, says Hesiod Theog. In this account we already perceive a combination of the most ancient with later notions. According to the former, Eros was one of the fundamental causes in the formation of the world, inasmuch as he was the uniting power of love, which brought order and harmony among the conflicting elements of which Chaos consisted.

In the same metaphysical sense he is conceived by Aristotle Metaph. In Plato's Symposium p. It is quite in accordance with the notion of the cosmogonic Eros, that he is described as a son of Cronos and Ge, of Eileithyia, or as a god who had no parentage, and came into existence by himself.

The Eros of later poets, on the other hand, who gave rise to that notion of the god which is most familiar to us, is one of the youngest of all the gods. The parentage of the second Eros is very differently described, for he is called a son of Aphrodite either Aphrodite Urania or Aphrodite Pandemosor Polymnia, or a son of Porus and Penia, who was begotten on Aphrodite's birthday.

Eros in this stage is always conceived and was always represented as a handsome youth, and it is not till about after the time of Alexander the Great that Eros is represented by the epigrammatists and the erotic poets as a wanton boy, of whom a thousand tricks and cruel sports are related, and from whom neither gods nor men were safe.

What is characteristic? definition and meaning - ashio-midori.com

He is generally described as a son of Aphrodite; but as love finds its way into the hearts of men in a manner which no one knows, the poets sometimes describe him as of unknown origin Theocrit.

In this stage Eros has nothing to do with uniting the discordant elements of the universe, or the higher sympathy or love which binds human kind together; but he is purely the god of sensual love, who bears sway over the inhabitants of Olympus as well as over men and all living creatures: His arms, consisting of arrows, which he carries in a golden quiver, and of torches, no one can touch with impunity.

His arrows are of different power: Eros is further represented with golden wings, and as fluttering about like a bird. His eyes are sometimes covered, so that he acts blindly. He is the usual companion of his mother Aphrodite, and poets and artists represent him, moreover, as accompanied by such allegorical beings as Pothos, Himeros, Dionysus, Tyche, Peitho, the Charites or Muses.

His statue and that of Hermes usually stood in the Greek gymnasia.Choose the Right Synonym for honor. Noun. honor, homage, reverence, deference mean respect and esteem shown to another.

honor may apply to the recognition of one's right to great respect or to any expression of such recognition. the nomination is an honor homage adds the implication of accompanying praise.

paying homage to Shakespeare reverence implies profound respect mingled with love. Symptoms of Codependency The following is a list of symptoms of codependency and being in a codependent relationship. You don’t need to have them all to qualify as codependent. Love is a pretty powerful drug.

Age characteristics of children - character traits - Truth for kids

When you feel it, you really feel it. It can suspend time, making the whole world seem still except for you two.

It feeds you more than any nourishment; you feel full in the presence of love. characteristic definition: The definition of characteristic is a distinguishing feature of a person or thing.

(adjective) An example of characteristic is the high levels of intelligence of a valedictorian. love is yellow.

it is positive and bright and safe, all things good. love is purple. it is inviting and exotic simultaneously. love is green. it is growing and branching endlessly in an abundance of directions. love is red. it is deep and passionate, coming from the depths never known to exist. John Keats didn’t love nature just for the sake of guidance or spiritual inspiration; rather, he adored nature just for the sake of its sensuousness and beauty.

Keats enjoy nature in its full essence.

Friendship (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy)